Weekly Economic Update

For the week of November 19 – 23.

Data releases in Canada this week include the heavy hitters of consumer prices and retail sales (both released on Friday). The release of retail sales data for September will follow August’s 0.1 percent decline (0.4 percent drop when excluding autos). In terms of consumer prices, Friday’s October figures posting follows a significant 0.4 percent drop on September’s month-over-month basis. Data releases in the United States this week include housing starts, durable goods, existing home sales and Markit US manufacturing PMI.

Manufacturing sales in Canada released stronger than expected in September, growing by 0.2 percent. Excluding auto sales, September’s figure saw a significant drop to -0.5 percent. 8 of the 21 measured industries experienced sale increases. New orders fell by 0.3 percent through the month, while unfilled orders jumped by 0.4 percent. Total inventories were up by 0.3 percent on a month-over-month basis. August’s reported 0.4 percent drop was revised further downward to a drop of 0.5 percent.

The Canadian dollar is currently trading down against the US dollar. Today’s expected range is 1.3128 – 1.3228.

Source: Bloomberg

Weekly Economic Update

For the week of November 12 – 16

It will be a quiet and short week for data in Canada, with the only market-moving data coming in the form of manufacturing sales and international securities transactions, both of which release on Thursday. We will see a bit more out of the United States this week with releases expected for consumer prices, retail sales and industrial production, among others. Consumer prices are expected to have grown by 0.3 percent on a headline basis during October, three times the speed that was seen in September. On a year-over-year basis, this should put growth at 2.5 percent. Excluding food and energy, growth rates are expected to sit at 0.2 and 2.2 percent respectively.

The string of declines in oil prices has reached eleven business days as priced ended the day down by 0.43 percent on Monday. Prices are down by a further 1.94 percent this morning. Prices shrugged off news that a potential 2019 output-cut could be on the table at an OPEC meeting over the weekend. Crude production the United States was at a record high last week with a level of 11.6 million barrels per day.

The Canadian dollar is currently trading up against the US dollar. Todays expected range is 1.3182 – 1.3282.

Source: Bloomberg

Weekly Economic Update

For the week of November 5 – 9, 2018

Employment in Canada missed expectations on a headline basis for October, adding 11.2K positions instead of the 15.0K that was expected. However, details of the release are stronger, with full-time positions actually increasing by 33.9K while part-time positions fell. Hourly earnings growth dropped significantly to 1.9 percent for the month against expectations for 2.3 percent. This marks the fifth month in a row where wage growth has slowed. Canada’s unemployment rate dropped to 5.8 percent due mostly to a shrinking labor force.

In the United States, nonfarm payrolls jumped by 250K in October, a significant beat over the 200K expected for the month. Some of the month’s strength is being attributed to a sort-of recovery from September’s figures which were adversely affected by Hurricane Florence. The unemployment rate in the United States remained unchanged at 3.7 percent.

It is going to be a quiet week for data in Canada, with the only notable release coming in the form of building permits and housing starts on Monday and Wednesday. In the United States, we will see releases for PPI final demand and wholesale inventories along with a Fed policy meeting on Thursday. As of now, the Fed is generally not expected to increase interest rates at this weeks meeting.

The Canadian dollar is currently trading up against the US dollar. Today’s expected range is 1.3048 – 1.3148.

Source: Bloomberg

Weekly Economic Update

For the week of October 29 – November 2.

Scheduled economic releases for Canada this week include update on GDP, new employment figures, and an update on international merchandise trade on Friday. August’s GDP release will follow July’s growth of 0.2 percent and 2.4 percent on a month-over-month and year-over-year basis respectively. In terms of employment, October’s release indicates a strong headline bump of 63.3K positions entirely made of part-time employees.

Scheduled economic releases for the United States this week include personal income, personal spending, ADP employment change, ISM manufacturing, trade balance, nonfarm payrolls and more. Nonfarm payrolls are expected to have jumped by 190K positions through the month of October, following September’s smaller bump of 134K. The unemployment rate is expected to remain at a record low level of 3.7 percent.

Third quarter GDP released on Friday last week came in at 3.5 percent, exceeding expectations of 3.3 percent and following second quarter GDP growth of 4.2 percent. If this pace continues for future readings, the United States will see its strongest back-to-back quarterly GDP readings since 2014. Third quarter strength is expected to have been pushed by business investment and consumer spending.

The Canadian dollar is currently trading up against the US dollar. Today’s expected range is 1.3041 – 1.3141.

Source: Bloomberg

Weekly Economic Update

For the week of October 22 – 26.

The week of the Bank of Canada’s policy meeting has arrived. Outside of the central banks interest decision on Wednesday, the only other notable release this week is from wholesale trade sales this morning. As of today, the market implied probability of the Bank of Canada increasing interest rates on Wednesday is 96.4%. Scheduled data releases in the United States this week include Markit US manufacturing PMI, new home sales, wholesale inventories, durable goods orders, and GDP. Also of note, the European Central Bank will be making a rate decision this week on Thursday.

Missed expectations for both retail sales and consumer prices last Friday ended the week on a disappointing note. Retail sales fell by 0.1 percent in August against expectations for a jump of 0.3 percent. July’s 0.3 percent growth was also revised downward to 0.2 percent.

Although economists were calling for growth of 0.1 percent, consumer prices fell by 0.4 percent in September, marking the second straight month of indicator declines. On a year-over-year basis, prices are up by 2.2 percent, dropping from last month’s reading of 2.8 percent.

The Canadian dollar is currently trading up against the US dollar. Today’s expected range is 1.3033 – 1.3133.

Source: Bloomberg

Weekly Economic Update

For the week of October 15 – 19.

Expected data releases in Canada this week include manufacturing sales, retail sales, and the ever-important consumer prices. Manufacturing sales are expected to have dropped by 0.8 percent in August after increasing by 0.9 percent in July. Retail sales are expected to have increased by 0.4 percent on a headline basis in August, and a lesser 0.2 percent when excluding autos. This 0.4 percent increase follows the slightly lower 0.3 percent gain in July.

Economists expect consumer prices will reverse August’s 0.1 percent decline, and will increase by 0.1 percent for the month of September on a month-over-month basis. The Bank of Canada will most likely be watching the results of this release, since their upcoming October 24 policy decision meeting is fast approaching. Currently, there is a 98.2 percent market implied probability of an interest rate hike at this meeting.

Expected data releases in the United States this week include retail sales, monthly budget statement, housing starts, and building permits.

The Canadian dollar is currently trading relatively flat against the US dollar. Today’s expected range is 1.2976 – 1.3076.

Source: Bloomberg

Weekly Economic Update

For the week of October 9 – 12.

It will be a quieter week for data in both Canada and the United States this week. Scheduled releases in Canada include housing starts, building permits, and new housing price index. Scheduled releases in the United States include consumer prices on Thursday, which will be watched carefully. Prices on a headline basis are expected to have increased by 0.2 and 2.4 percent on a month-over-month and year-over-year basis respectively. Excluding food and energy, growth levels are sitting at 0.2 and 2.3 percent respectively.

Employment data exceeded the expected 25.0K on a headline basis, rising by 63.3K. Although part-time positions jumped way higher by 80.2K, full-time positions actually dropped by 16.9K. Wage growth dropped to a level of 2.2 percent from 2.6 percent for permanent employees. As expected overall, the unemployment rate dropped to 5.9 percent.

Nonfarm payrolls data missed expectations for 185K jobs, landing instead at 134K. Hurricane Florence is one of the main factors for the lower than expected release. Despite the miss on the headline figures, the unemployment rate dropped further than expected to 3.7 percent, a shocking 48-year low. Lastly, August’s nonfarm payroll was revised from 201K to 270K.

Both US and Canada government yields are trading flat to 1bps higher with S&P futures lower (-14.5). WTI crude oil is trading higher this morning at $74.71. The Canadian dollar is weaker against the US dollar for the sixth straight session. Today’s expected range is 1.2946 – 1.3046.

Source: Bloomberg

Weekly Economic Update

For the week of October 1 – 5.

Canadian GDP exceeded expectations for the month of July, growing by 0.2 percent on a month-over-month basis, and by 2.4 percent on a year-over-year basis. 12 out of 20 measured industrial sectors experienced increases. Manufacturing was the largest increasing contributing factor (0.13 percentage points), while construction was the largest decreasing contributing factor.

Scheduled data releases in Canada this week include Markit Canada’s manufacturing PMI, international merchandise trade, and employment. September’s employment figures will follow up August’s 51.6K positions. Scheduled data releases in the United States this week include Markit US manufacturing PMI, construction spending, ISM manufacturing, ADP employment change, durable goods, trade balance, and employment. Nonfarm payrolls are expected to release at a level around 185K for the month of September.

The Canadian dollar is up significantly this morning after a deal was reached to include Canada in a trilateral NAFTA deal. Negotiators worked around the clock over the weekend to reach their Sunday deadline. The new deal offers greater access to Canadian dairy to the United States. Further details will be provided in tomorrow’s update. Today’s expected range for the Canadian dollar is 1.2756 – 1.2856.

Source: Bloomberg

Weekly Economic Update

For the week of September 24 – 28.

Canada’s most important scheduled data release this Friday will be July’s GDP update, following up June’s posting of zero percent month-over-month growth rate, and 2.4 percent year-over-year growth rate. Thursday’s scheduled GDP data release in the United States will more than likely be overshadowed by Wednesday’s Fed meeting. As of now, markets fully anticipate (100 percent probability) the Fed will choose to raise interest rates at their meeting.

Canada’s consumer prices for the month of August released in line with expectations. Although prices decreased by 0.1 percent on a month-over-month basis, and increased by 2.8 percent on a year-over-year basis, both releases declined from July’s figures. Transportation was the largest decreasing contributing factor, while clothing and footwear was the largest increasing contributing factor.

Retail sales in Canada met expectations on a headline basis, increasing by 0.3 percent in June after dropping by a revised 0.1 percent. Excluding autos, retail sales jumped to 0.9 percent, exceeding expectations for a 0.6 percent jump.

The Canadian dollar is currently trading down against the US dollar. Today’s expected range is 1.2895 – 1.2995.

Source: Bloomberg